Jazz blues

By | April 4, 2021


Jazz blues – Studio





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Now it’s time for the expanded blues scale, the one most commonly used in progressive blues … E | —————————– ———————————— 5–7–8–9–10- -12– B | ——————————————– ——— 4–5–7–8 ———————- G | ——- —————————— 5–6–7–8–4 —— —————————- D | ——————– —— 4–5–7–8 ———————————- ————— A | ———– 4–5–6–7–8 ——— ————-


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How does blues sound in practice played in the way described in this blog ???? This is a blues album I recorded last year. Johan Paxom`s Guitar – Heart´s Blues mvh


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We will now compose a jazz blues in Cdur, which involves, among other things, a technique called “Back cycling”. It is very famous in jazz. Especially in Bebop blues but also otherwise. In Bebop music, a blues skeleton is often used, which is then re-harmonized to almost unrecognizable to the uninitiated. We use bluessevenths as usual for our blues .. In bars 2,3 and 4 we use the technique “back cycling”. This means that we play the following; B7 -E7 in time


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Good ways to vary the ii-VI progression are valuable. We’ve already been through John Coltrane’s “The Backdoor Progression”. This time we take an example in major. Introduces jazz pianist Tadd Dameron’s variant. Here’s how to get “Tadd Dameron’s turnaround” in four steps. ii-VI and Cmaj7; Step 1; Dm7 – G7 – Am7 Am is parallel key, median, to Cmaj7. Step 2; D7 – G7 – A7 Quality change of the chords. Step 3; bA7 – bD7 – bE7 Tritonu


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As “the Monster” (am. Jazz slang for “the Superior player”) in a jazz band that plays a blues, it is important to find the right scales for the chords before the solo / improvisation. And with the right feeling for just that phase the blues or solo is in at the moment. It can also be good, sometimes, to play something unexpected to capture the interest of the listeners. To be able to ornament and vary their licks and motifs. Thinks it’s stupid to exclude scales and possibilities but there are still d


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Blues and jazz are very much based on different rhythms from the musicians involved. Clave´s are different rhythms marked traditionally by two round wooden blocks you hit against each other. The drummer can also mark the clave and it is excellent to build musical motifs with notes on a clave´. Or an accompaniment. Maybe a chord piece where all the instruments and drums are syncopated in one clave. The most famous in the blues must probably be “backbeat”, which does not need anyone closer per


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Modal Interchange or Modal Mixure (older name.) Is a technique that allows you to borrow chords from another scale in the same key. Usually used to make major progressions a little tougher and / or darker. What you need to play / compose jazz blues and to understand such is; Mixolydisk; v, bVII, I7, iii * Doric; i, bIII, vi * Aeolian; iv, bVI, ii * Phrygian; bII, v *, bvii There are more variants that involve the Melodic minor scale as well as the Harmo


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Here is a review and a little explanation of the progressions in the previous post in this blog. If you have followed it from the beginning, you can easily understand the ideas behind these 3 blues. “Smoke” C9 – B7 – C9 – C9 “Smoke” is written with “bluessevenths” played as 9 chords. B7 is a tritonus substitution for F7 here. F9 – F9 – # F7 – C9 # F7 is a tritonus substitution for C / Gm13 – # F7, Fm7 – # C7, bEmaj7 – Dm7b5, G7b9 Gm to show that it is a


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Here are my workinsheets for three of my jazz blues. // Blues 12; an reharmonized by Johan Paxom 2013. // “Fallin´in Love” C major variant, two reruns AABA, of which the last rerun is dedicated to improvisation, 4/4 jazz funk, 75 bmp,; bEmaj7 – B7 – C6 – C6 (#G Thaichikicho) (C Blues, G Mixolydisk) F6 – F6 – # F7 – C6 (G Mixolydisk) G9 – # F7, Fmaj7 – # C7, Am7 – bAmaj7, bDmaj7 (C Blues, G Mixolydisk) (# G Thaichikicho) // “Smoke” C minor variant


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John Coltrane´s “The Backdoor progression” A substitution of iim7b5 to make ii-V7-I sound a little bluesier. To make ii-V7-I (see article above) sound a bit bluesier, John Coltrane developed a substitution for the iim7b5 chord in progression. He let the orchestra play as a bVII7 instead. That is, with a large ters semantic chord to ii7b5, if you will. The progression then becomes bVII7-V7-I and sounds really bluesy. It is known (famous !!!) during n


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If there is an error in the article, please let me know so that it can be corrected. In this way, we finally get to a good article ang. Jazzblues .. mvh // pxm Delta Blues and Chicago Blues; We start from the root of all blues, called Delta blues which is played first with the Moll penatatonic scale on harmonica accompaniment played on acoustic guitar played only dominant 7 chords starting in Mississippi. The Chicago blues was later developed and played with drums, piano, electric guitar


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Source:studio.se